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Feb 27, 2017 02:53 AM EST

College Students Admit To Cheating, Instructors Are Prone To Do The Same, Survey Shows

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Colleges and universities across the United States continue to face the issue about academic dishonesty among students and close to half of these students admit to cheat on both exams and papers.

There are many reasons why college students cheat, they feel like they feel the pressure, and think that they do not have any other choice but to cheat especially when others are already doing it, according to John Hopkins Magazine. They do it using a variety of techniques, and a recent survey says that their instructors are prone to do the same thing.

Kessler International surveyed 300 students who attend in college, and 86 percent of these students admitted to cheating in one way or another in school, according to Campus Technology. More than half of the respondents perceive cheating as an acceptable behavior, and some even said it is needed to stay on top. And among those who admitted that they cheat, 97 percent they were able to get away with it.

The college students were also asked how they did the cheating, and some of them said they would copy their classmates' assignments. This makes up 76 percent of the most popular form of cheating. Other students said they do plagiarism but directly copying content from the internet sources, some use their mobile phones to cheat during class, and a smaller percentage admitted to purchasing custom papers and essays online. Only a very small percentage (12 percent) if students claimed they never cheated.

Part of the survey also asked the respondents about the ethics of their own professors and a lot of them revealed their awareness about the bribery and sexual exploits by teachers to students for the adjustments of grades. Some teachers were also reported pressuring students to purchase books that they have written themselves so that the students can pass the class.

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