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Jul 11, 2016 09:35 AM EDT

Princeton University’s Annual Giving Campaign Put Up $59.3 Million, Tuition Fee At The Institution Under Hillary Clinton

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The Annual Giving campaign of Princeton University raised a healthy $59,334,144, which is the second highest total in the history of the Annual Giving.

The Annual Giving campaign was being participated by the 58.4 percent of the institution's undergraduate alumni. The results are remarkable for the participants' strength and extend across all of Princeton's constituencies such as parents, graduate alumni and friends.

President Christopher L. Eisgruber said that he is thrilled with the results of this year's Annual Giving. The funds from the campaign enable Princeton University to hold on at the forefront of teaching and research, and can run across the full financial needs of their students, according to News At Princeton.

Eisgruber also expressed his gratitude to the hard work and dedication of many volunteers.

Princeton's Class of 1991, with 71.1 percent participated, the campaign raised about $7,279,091. During the 30th Reunion, the Class of 1986 raised  $5,351,986. And in the 75th Reunion, the Class of 1941 raised $429,030.

Louise S. Sams, Annual Giving Chair, stated that the generosity of the Princeton family and the devotion of their extraordinary volunteers are the keys to campaign's continued success.

On the other hand, if Hillary Clinton becomes president of the United States, choosing a state university could get more appealing over a private college.

On Wednesday, it has been revealed that low- and middle-income students will not pay the tuition fee at in-state public colleges under a new part of Clinton's college affordability plan.

However, a number of top private schools in the United States already made tuition free for low- and middle-income students. Like in Princeton University, students from families that makes less than $120,000 yearly income, don't pay anything for tuition and receive grant money that compensate some of the student's room and board.

While Stanford University covers tuition for students from families making less than $125,000 per year, WMUR reported.

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