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Jan 08, 2017 01:13 AM EST

Smartphones Games Can Help Treat Depression, Scientists Claim

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Applications that claim to help with depression and other mental issues are not really uncommon nowadays but just recently, scientists have found a link between playing games and treating people who are suffering from depression.

Games are no longer just a source of entertainment because researchers from the University of Washington have found that they can also improve brain function, according to the Daily Mail. The research suggests that playing games, specifically the so-called Project EVO can improve a person's neurological performance.

Project EVO can run on phones and tablets and is basically designed to improve a person's focus and attention. The project offers certain cognitive benefits compared to behavioral therapy.

The study involved participants who never experienced using a tablet, let alone, playing a video game but they were able to comply 100 percent. They were asked to play the game five times a week, for 20 minutes and others even played it more.

Patricia Arean, the author of the study, said that people who are suffering from moderate depression do better with these apps because they address or help treat the condition. They explained that EVO was not made to directly treat the symptoms of depression but the effects of playing the game can result in improved cognitive functions.

According to Tech2, people who are suffering from late-life depression and are having difficulty with focus and concentration can benefit from the game because the mobile technology can help them better focus their attention and keep them from getting distracted. The results of this study are said to be promising because it can greatly help the people who do not have the access to other therapies and effective problem solving therapies. This study was published in the journal Depression and Anxiety.

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