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Oct 30, 2013 09:46 AM EDT

Men Stare at Women’s Chest and Waist than Eyes and Face, Study

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Scientists have found adding evidence to the fact that the first thing a man notices about a woman is her chest or her waist than the eyes or face.

According to University of Nebraska- Lincoln study researchers, the reason for such behavior is either sexist or to inspect potential mates for child bearing

'We live in a culture in which we constantly see women objectified in inter- actions on television and in the media,' lead author Prof Sarah Gervais told Daily Mail UK. 'When you turn your own lens on everyday and ordinary women, we focus on those parts, too.'

"Until now, we didn't have evidence people were actually doing that to women's bodies. We have women's self-reports, but this is some of the first work to document that people actually engage in this," Gervais told USA Today.

The researchers arrived at the conclusion after attaching eye-tracking devices to 36 men that measured how long they looked at something. The experiment was not just limited to men, 29 females were also tested.

The participants were shown pictures of ten women with three body shapes:  curvy, thin or medium build.

The researchers found that men gazed longer at women's bodies than their faces, particularly those with larger breasts, narrower waists and bigger hips. Also, women looked at other women's breasts and hips more than their faces.

Gervais said that women might be scrutinizing other females to check out competition.

The study has been published in the journal Sex Role.

Researcher Kun Guo, who also uses eye tracking in his studies at the University of Lincoln in the United Kingdom, said that the technology provides 'more objective measurements' than questionnaires, which are subjective.

"The beauty of eye movements is that it is more difficult to inhibit," Guo told USA Today.

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