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Jul 07, 2016 08:29 PM EDT

More Schools Are Enrolling Foreign Students; Eyes Increased Revenue Among Diversity

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More schools are enrolling foreign students to increase revenue, as well as diversification of its student body.

A growing number of schools are warming up to the recent trend of enrolling more foreign students, with its higher tuition fees, to generate more revenue. Most schools cites the importance of diversity among its student body, the Boston Globe reported.

For the past year, U.S. colleges had increased its number of international students, and the trend doesn't end with colleges. From 2014 to 2015, foreign students studying in the U.S. had increased by 10 percent, which is about 975,000 pupils.

Recruiting firms are utilizing the world's demand for education in the West, as of which China is still topping the charts for that demand with roughly 304,000 pupils. India follows, albeit far from the numbers from China, with 133,000 students seeking education in the States, according to the Institute of International Education.

Due to the benefits of diversifying the student body, as well as the increased rates for international students, it has become apparent that the more and more public high schools are following suit.

Private schools have long since embraced the influx of international students into their institutions, providing education for foreign students seeking U.S. diplomas, and this may be largely due to the federal law that limits foreign students to only a year of study at public schools.

The limit may have played a significant role as to why public schools are behind with the trend. As how events may have played out, it seems that the international students are now working around the limit.

Foreign students may have considered studying in U.S. high schools guarantee them passes to pursue higher education in the United States, according to U.S. News & World Report.

The booming business of recruiting students from around the globe comes with greater risks. Not only it may have a clash with cultures, or other factors, analysts predict that it might also increase the hit rate of the schools, which would directly influence the reputation of the school itself.

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