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Mar 02, 2017 11:48 AM EST

Spotify Takes on Tidal; Hi-Fi Music On Its Way for Less

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Spotify is reportedly working hard on providing high fidelity music for its subscribers and is now studying the pricing. This is a direct hit towards Tidal, which uses lossless quality music as its marketing edge. But whether it can truly rival Tidal's 1411Kbps Hi-Fi music quality remains to be heard.

According to multiple reports, Spotify will deliver something that is called Spotify Hi-Fi, which is a music streaming service package with songs containing audio quality similar to CDs. This is what its biggest rival Tidal has offered ever since, Engadget reported. Now that Spotify moves inside Tidal's turf, it will give its 40 million subscribers more options.

The music streaming provider is still in the middle of its price testing, The Verge reported. They run a rest for a small group of subscribers and offered the package for $5 to $10 a month. Included in the subscription fee tests are the premium subscription features.

This new service is not actually a big surprise considering everyone can access lossless music quality through their Android and smartphone devices these days. Apple is hot on its Lithning connector wireless headphone, while other devices are now going to use USB-C ports all in the purpose of experiencing really high quality music on the go.

This may prove to be lucrative for the streaming company. Earlier reports suggest that Spotify is struggling turning profits. But delivering lossless quality music to its subscribers gives listeners more reason to choose it over Apple Music.

Moreover, if the monthly fee would be less than what Tidal is offering right now, then Tidal subscribers might transfer to Spotify. Apple Music will be obliterated soon too as it only currently uses lossy 256Kbps AAC format.

There are now words if Spotify will exceed Tidal's 1411Kbps just yet or when Spotify Hi-Fi will arrive in the market. But it's definitely going to be sooner than expected because the company already rolled out the new service to a few of its subscribers.

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