Monday, Dec 18 2017 | Updated at 11:30 AM EST

Stay Connected With Us F T R

May 23, 2017 06:08 PM EDT

NASA Space Bag of Neil Armstrong Auctioned For $4 Million; A Sotheby’s Space Exploration Sale [VIDEO]

Close
Obama targets Trump in Rutgers University speech: Ignorance is not a virtue

A part of space exploration history will be sold in July, a pouch that was once filled with moon rocks. During Neil Armstrong's historic trip to the moon in 1969, the astronaut filled the pouch with moon rocks from the lunar Sea of Tranquility. NASA's space bag will be sold at the auction in Sotheby's Space Exploration sale.

A small white NASA pouch marked as Lunar Sample Return, which was bought by Nancy Lee Carlson two years ago for $995, is expected to go on sale for $4 million at the Sotheby's auction. The small white pouch is said to be very expensive as it is sprinkled with moon dust, Huffington Post reported.

After astronaut Neil Armstrong filled the small white NASA bag with moon rocks during his trip to the moon on the Apollo 11 mission, Armstrong turned over the bag to a Houston lab, which emptied the bag and then lost track of it. However, the bag eventually appeared on a U.S. Marshals auction website.

Like most of the valuable artifacts from the historic moon landing, the NASA space bag never permanently made it to a museum. The pouch was up for auction at an auction house a few times back in 2014, but it was unsuccessful to attract any bids. Then in 2015, Carlson only paid just $995 for the NASA white pouch. In December, a judge ruled the bag legally belonged to Carlson and not to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Sotheby's reported.

As the NASA space bag represents the culmination of a massive national effort which involves a generation of Americans, the NASA space pouch is expected to go very expensive for the reason that the space agency doesn't allow a person to own any bit of the moon. Meanwhile, other items that will be up for auction at the Sotheby's Space Exploration event include emblems from astronauts as well as engineering models.

Meanwhile, Watch The Video Here:

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics