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Apr 06, 2017 07:44 AM EDT

The Modern Workplace: Robots May Takeover As Managers Soon [VIDEO]

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There is already stiff competition in the job market today but it seems that it may even get tougher later on. This is because robots have the potential to replace humans in jobs; even supervisory posts.

Robots have already taken over some jobs that were used to be done by humans. According to consultancy firm PwC, 38 percent of jobs in the U.S. have a high risk of automation by the early 2030s. U.K. jobs come at 30 percent while it was predicted that German jobs could be automated by as high as 35 percent.

Fortune noted that PwC's report implied that more robots in the workplace may mean higher salaries. The productivity gains brought by automation could raise the average pre-tax incomes. However, this may not be evenly spread across income groups.

In a report by TIME last year, robots have started to humans as pharmacists, cab drivers, debt collectors, bank tellers, astronauts, waiters, writers, rescue workers and housekeepers. Foxconn, the largest contract electronics manufacturer in the world, previously announced that it has automated 60,000 jobs in one of its factories.

The Associated Press has revealed that its robot named Wordsmith had been writing content for the publication since July of 2014 without help from humans. The publication implemented the robot's business-related stories on corporate earnings and stock market performance. More recently, the company has started to use the robot writer to create content for local sports stories.

TIME added that robots are also capable of taking over managerial positions. This may pose a problem especially if they lead humans, who are governed by both logic and emotions.

Moreover, robots as partners are becoming a thing of reality. RealDolls, a firm based in California that creates lifelike adult toys, has announced its plans to release an artificial intelligence-enhanced sex doll next year, which will prove to be quite controversial if it does push through.

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