Wednesday, Dec 13 2017 | Updated at 01:53 PM EST

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Apr 05, 2017 07:40 AM EDT

New Research Suggests Being Funny Lowers Life Expectancy

Close
Pokémon Go used for Russian-linked election meddling?

Laughter is a good medicine says the old adage but a new study disqualifies that by saying funny people have a lower life expectancy. Does that mean people should abandon their sense of humor altogether?

A study conducted by the Australian Catholic University said that the funnier people are, the earlier they will die. The researchers came into the conclusion after analyzing and comparing the deaths that happen among three kinds of actors - dramatic, comedic, and stand-up comedians. They have found out that stand up comedians are twice more likely to die compared to those who belong to the other two groups.

The real surprise that emerged from the study is that the funnier the stand-up comedian is, the earlier they are likely to die. The researchers said that for every 10 points a comedian is in terms of being funny, there is a 7 percent possibility of him or her dying. That means a comedian who ranks 50th is 70 percent more likely to die earlier than someone who is ranked 150th.

One of the factors that might contribute to this early death is the fact that stand-up comedians have a tendency to live a solitary lifestyle behind the scenes and traveling alone most of the time.

Moreover, another study showed that most comedians are plagued with depression. Psychologists have found substantial evidence about the age-old belief that creativity is associated with madness, which is a common occurrence in comedians. According to the study, this happens because of bisociation, a term used to describe two dissimilar concepts are brought together in an unsuitable manner. Humor happens when an idea is suddenly seen in an unexpected manner. This same process also happens to people who are diagnosed as bipolar or schizophrenic.

The study is published in the International Journal of Cardiology.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics