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Jan 09, 2017 10:35 PM EST

The Right Diet PlanAccording to Your Specific Body Needs

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A wellness inspired dinner
If you are looking into becoming healthier this year, here are the diet plans you need to adhere to according to your body needs.
(Photo : Getty Images/Mark Sagliocco)

A healthy diet is not only important in order to lose weight but is also helpful when it comes to preventing chronic diseases as well as to boost your brain power.

Now that the holidays are over, most people are looking into going on healthy diets as a part of their New Year's resolution, and if you have the same goal, here are the diet plans you might want to follow according to what your body needs.

DASH Diet

According to Mail Online, DASH diet is the diet that tops the overall ranking when it comes to America's most favorite. DASH, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension is designed to prevent or reduce the risk of high blood pressure. The DASH diet involves eating more fruits and vegetables and low fat dairy foods. You should also reduce your sodium intake and just have moderation when eating whole grains, fish, nuts and poultry.

MIND Diet

Now if you are looking for a good diet for a healthier brain, MIND diet should be the one for you, according to US News. MIND diet or Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, is intended to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and mental decline. This diet is a combination of DASH and Mediterranean diets which emphasizes on eating green leafy vegetables, berries, nuts, whole grains, poultry, fish, and wine.

Flexitarian Diet

This one is probably going to be the favorite diet plan of anyone who wants to lose weight this year. Flexitarian diet aims to help a person lose weight and achieve optimal health. Those who have chosen this diet incorporate more vegetables in their diet but they do not completely eliminate meat. Flexitarians have a lower rate of heart disease, diabetes and cancer and are said to live an average of 3.6 years longer.

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