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Jun 10, 2016 06:53 AM EDT

New Study Reveals Colleges Unnecessarily Assign Students In Remedial Classes

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A recent study at the University of Alaska revealed that colleges assign students to remedial classes, even for those who doesn't necessarily need to.

College administrators normally rely on standardized tests to assign which students should be admitted directly to college-level classes and which ones who need remedial classes. The study showed that SATs, ACTs, and ACCUPLACER scores are not reliable sources in predicting whether the student would struggle to cope with college-level Math and English, the US News reported.

The researchers explained that 47% placed in remedial classes has managed to pass college-level English, while 23% passed college-level Math. The data revealed that the students' high school grade point average is consistent with the passing rate.

This goes to show that the students' GPA shows higher accuracy in predicting whether the student would cope with the college-level subjects; compared to the standardized tests' scores, as published in the Institute of Education Sciences' website.

The lead researcher, Michelle Hodara, stated that the group's findings does not eliminate the need for standardized tests, but merely adding in more determining factors than relying solely on test results.

Hodara suggests that GPAs should be included in determining college preparedness among high school students. The lead author has said that their findings are consistent with what community college researchers and practitioners were able to find.

Hodara continued on saying that the student's GPA provides a more accurate indicator whether the pupil is ready for college-level subjects.

The researchers' findings indeed spark a consideration in reevaluation in assessing the students' potential performance in college. The results have yet to see any changes in the system, but it does shed light on the financial issue that while students attend remedial classed, the students doesn't earn college credits, all the while paying full tuition, according to the New York Times.

Most colleges across the country still rely on standardized test scores in determining whether the student needs to attend remedial courses or proceed directly to college classes.

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