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Jun 20, 2017 07:53 AM EDT

College Applications Made Easy With These Internet Tips College Hopefuls Can Make Use Of [VIDEO]

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Online Behavior
There are proper ways to behave online especially for college applicants.
(Photo : Screen grab RapidLearningLife/YouTube)

College applicants have been warned for years to mind their social media posts. For one, they might the students' future career paths. Although schools rarely revoke admission for online misdemeanors, Harvard University recently rejected 10 students for "offensive" Facebook posts. Here are five Dos and Don'ts for those trying to get into college:

Grandmother rule

San Francisco University High School once told its students to not post anything they think would sadden their grandmothers. If it will disappoint their grandmas, it will definitely upset the rest. Now, that mythical nanny is held up as an icon of moral standards.

Also, do not make jokes online unless others see you as the funniest kid in class. In modern times, a wrong sense of humor can be risky.

Do not brag

Never boast an accomplishment, more so, a wrongdoing. Colgate University once encountered a student who bragged about her college applications. On her social media account, the student mentioned that she applied early to Colgate and another institution.

This, however, violates n agreement students sign to apply early to only one school. Both schools later rejected the girl.

Rename if necessary

According to ABC News, email addresses must sound appropriate. Senseless, vulgar, and unprofessional usernames will appeal to teenagers, but not to adults. Online behavior is also important. Always be mindful of comments and trolling in other accounts.

Google Yourself

Princeton Review provides social media tips for college applicants such as "Google yourself". Basically, the results will tell something about the online manners of that particular student. It added that people should always check their privacy settings to know what can be seen publicly and what needs to be kept private.

Statistics

Surveys suggest that online scrutiny of college applicants is rising. Out of 365 admission officers asked, 35 percent admitted that they check Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and other networking sites. This, apparently, is to learn more about the student. Kaplan Test Prep released the poll in February.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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