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May 27, 2017 07:46 AM EDT

New Tech Lets Users See Through Walls Like Batman; What Else Can Humans Invent Soon [VIDEO]

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In recent Batman video games, players were given the ability to scan through walls using one of the many gadgets the superhero has at his disposal. Now, the same thing is possible in real life as German scientists from the Technical University of Munich develop a similar device.

According to Fossbytes, the Batman-like gadget works using simple Wi-Fi signal. Philipp Holl, in earlier media interviews, said that the scanner probes a room with someone's Wi-Fi transmission. For the record, Holl, together with a professor from the Technical University of Munich, developed the concept behind the new tech toy.

To further illustrate, the technology exploits Wi-Fi's ability to pass through walls. With the use of two antennas, they record a "Wi-Fi field" around a particular room. The antennas then catch the intensity and the phase of the Wi-Fi field, both from its source and the areas it bounces from.

Per the same source, the result is a "holographic image of the room. However, the image is not yet that vivid. Nonetheless, the concept has been proven effective in practice and not just in theory.

Now, Futurism reported that the ability to see through walls might be a little disturbing at first. For one, it could open doors to potential privacy exploitation issues. Fortunately, the developers from the Technical University of Munich assure that the gadget is unlikely to be used to spy bedrooms.

Rather than being a nuisance tech, the Batman-like device could definitely boost rescue and security surveillance techniques. The gadget can be used to spy agencies for legitimate operations requiring the scanning of hideouts. Also, it appears to be very useful in looking for victims under rubbles after a huge disaster like an earthquake or avalanche. The antennas could be placed in a truck and then be driven around the debris to look for survivors.

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