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May 02, 2017 09:52 AM EDT

UBC Scientist Developed A Viable Formula For Time Travel [VIDEO]

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Humans have been fascinated with the idea of time travel throughout history. It has been the subject of a number of science fiction books and movies. However, a scientist recently declared that he discovered a viable formula for time travel.

Ben Tippett, a scientist from the University of British Columbia in Canada, said that he was able to come up with a mathematical formula and Einstein's theory to make time travel possible.

According to Einstein, the gravitational fields are a product of the distortion in the fabric of space and time. This theory has been proven when a group of physicists and scientists confirmed that gravitational fields are caused by colliding black holes which are billions of light-years away from Earth.

Tippett said that dividing space into three dimensions and placing time in a separate dimension is wrong. He said that the four dimensions should be perceived simultaneously as a space-time continuum with all the directions connected to each other. Using Einstein's theory, the scientist said that the curvature of the space-time is what causes the curved orbits of the planet. On the other hand, planets and stars move in straight lines in flat space-time.

In the presence of a massive star, the geometry of space-time is curved and even when the trajectory of the surrounding planets is straight, it will bend and follow the curvature of the star. He added that even the surface of this space-time curves in the vicinity of a massive star. That means time moves slower, which is also evident when objects get near a black hole.

Using this theory as his basis, Tippet said the time machine models he's going to make will utilize the curved space-time to 'bend time in a circle' rather than using a straight line. That circle, he said, will take the passengers back in time.

There is one problem, though, he said - mathematically, the time machine is feasible but the materials to build it are not yet available. The materials he's referring to are exotic materials that have the power to manipulate space-time. Unfortunately, they haven't been discovered yet.

The paper is published in the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity

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