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Apr 17, 2017 01:08 PM EDT

Albert Einstein : A Flawed Human Life Of The Godly Physicist [Video]

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On April 25, the National Geographic Channel airs its first scripted TV series about a godly physicist entitled "Genius". Rather than narrating the typical story about science, it will talk about the controversial life of Albert Einstein. The 10-part show tackles more interesting things like his journey to stardom.

Apparently, upon the introduction of the General Theory of Relativity, Einstein became one of the world's first modern celebrities. At the age of 36, he was not experimenting on beakers and flasks but on love and life. The series is set in 1916.

For one, Einstein had two wives and one mistress. Per Forbes, his first wife Mileva Marić (played by Samantha Coley) was a physicist too. On the other hand, Elsa Einstein, played by Emily Watson, was not just his second wife but also his first cousin.

Now, while living and teaching at Princeton University, the genius had an affair with a Russian spy. Her name was Margarita Konenkova. This happened between 1945 and 1946.

According to Science News, Nat Geo points out that "Genius" is not a documentary but a dramatization. The series basically unravels the secrets of the human side of the legendary physicist. In fact, the first episode opens with a murder followed by a sex scene.

Well, the viewers should not anticipate anything about the might of Einstein. The explanations are quite vague too, to the point that those unfamiliar with his theories will understand just a little. In the same manner, those who know them will not learn anything new.

"Genius" portrays Einstein as a flawed man. In it, he was a societal "pain in the head" and an academic rebel. He had issues with his religion and had complicated relationships with women. Lastly, the series highlights one of his craziest contributions to the world of science: the Atomic bomb.

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