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Apr 01, 2017 12:02 AM EDT

University Research Explores The Existence Of Dark Matter, Results A Must Wait

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There is a possibility that dark matter is only imaginary. Researchers at the Eötvös Loránd University believe that the idea claiming that 68 percent of the universe is made up of black matter may disappear soon. The team is composed of Hungarian and American astronomers.

According to Science Daily, people know that the galaxies were formed from the Big Bang, 13.8 billion years ago. Since then, the universe has been expanding at great speeds based on Hubble's Law. With this in mind, scientists earlier claimed that dark matter is responsible for the expansion.

However, in the recent study led by PhD student Gábor Rácz, there is an alternative explanation. For one thing, the team argued that conventional models of cosmology rely on approximations that ignore its structure, wherein "matter is assumed to have a uniform density." Cosmology, for the record, is the study of the origin and evolution of the universe.

Dr. László Dobos, the co-author of the paper, noted that Albert Einstein's equations of general relativity are so complicated that "no solution for the effect of cosmic structures has been found for hundred years." Today's scientists rely on approximations which result in "serious side-effects" like the need for dark energy.

Per Forbes, study shows that the Sun is made up of "normal" matter such as protons, neutrons, and electron. Nonetheless, there are a lot of other sources of matter including planets, gas, plasma, and star dust. The controversial thing is that dark energy cannot be formed from any of these particles. Thus, without origin, something technically does not exist.

Now, scientists have reconstructed the evolution of the universe. Unlike traditional simulations with smooth expansion, the new pattern suggests different regions expand at different rates. Dobos later assured that they do not question the validity of the theory of relativity. However, they question the validity of the approximate solutions.

The team's findings may soon explain the acceleration of the universe without the need for dark energy. If proven to be true, then the direction taken by physicists will change dramatically. At the very least, the team gets to start a lively debate regarding the mysterious black matter.

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