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Mar 22, 2017 10:04 PM EDT

Idaho State Pushes Fetal Tissue Research Bill Amidst State Ban

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Senator Cliff Bayer of Idaho finally introduced a research bill that would finally put to light the apparent ban on selling, procurement and donation of fetal tissue. The move also aims to restart the programs halted by the issuance of the ban last July of 2016.

According to USnews, the state had significant progress on fetal tissue research prior the ban as state research institutes in Idaho have made strides in studying the effects of stem cells on curing diseases. However, since the ban was put in place, research stalled. though this might be not for long as the bill seemed to catch traction with the state legislative body.

Research in Idaho desire further development of fetal tissue research as they see huge potential in medicine. Research on this may lead to better diagnostic procedures, early detection of metabolic and genetic diseases and treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular ailments. If research goes well, it would mean the survival of thousands of new born deaths, especially in developing and under-developed countries in the world.

Tests on human embryo have long been frowned upon by various conservative groups all over the world. However, most of the argument comes mainly from preconceived misconceptions that fetal tissue research make use of aborted fetus for experiments. Most of the studies and tests of vaccines and medicines are commonly done first on non-human tissue. Though, clinical tests on humans are needed to really test whether medicines and vaccines are compatible with human physiology.

The Senate State Affairs Committee have finally passed the fetal tissue research bill and a full hearing would follow soon after. IF the bill goes through and passed, Idaho tissue research will again move at full blast, hoping to catch up on lost time as medical research race against the ever-mutating world of bacteria and viruses that cause disease and death worldwide.

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