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Mar 22, 2017 10:32 AM EDT

Breast Cancer Vaccine To Be Produced Through A Five Year Research

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Researchers from New Zealand have boldly stated that they will undertake a five-year research aimed to develop a breast cancer vaccine. Their aim, to completely stop cancer on its tracks.

The Breast Cancer Foundation of New Zealand (BCFNZ) and the Victoria University's Ferrier Research institute in New Zealand has embarked on their quest to find the ultimate cure for cancer. Initial funding for the research totaled $500,000 to kickstart the project was from the BCFNZ. The researchers are optimistic with their five-year plan and hopes that a cure will finally be discovered.

According to Victoria news, Professor Richard Furneaux, Ferrier Research Institute director said that the technology for treating cancer is already in place, but it needs more testing, especially on humans. He added that human clinical trials need massive investments and strict adherence to regulations.

They have already developed a synthetic vaccine that targets tumour-specific T cells causing the ejection of cancers cells. The study is promising but as of the moment, tests have only been carried out on animals. This is the main objective of this research, to finally start human testing and finally generate data to determine if indeed they have made a breakthrough.

According to Cancer.net, an estimated 40,800 people have died of breast cancer in 2016 alone. The number is constantly increasing especially as many of the death are due to late detection. This is the problem that faces the researchers as they scramble against time to immediately find the cure to this incurable disease.

The Ferrier research institute has a remarkable track record in immunology and developing vaccines for commercial use. Though the project is still starting, the vaccine, if indeed developed, would be a significant moment in history. However, because of the resource intensiveness of the research, it is unlikely that the vaccine would be cheap enough for people from every walk of life to avail. However, foundations like the BCFNZ are staunch on their desire to rid the world of cancer by any means possible.

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