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Mar 13, 2017 06:03 AM EDT

Working Class Students 'Dropout' From College And Money Is Just One Of The Reasons

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The constant increase of the college costs seems to be unstoppable, and it presents a huge challenge for those who find it hard to keep up with their expenses, but want to obtain a degree. This is one of the reasons why many students from low income families are not able to finish their four years - but financial challenges are not the only reasons.

College life is not a walk in the park, especially for the working class students. These lower income students are the ones who are more likely to drop out and not finish college compared to their wealthier counterparts, according to Working-Class Perspectives. There are those who finish college in six years, and there are some who are unable to finish to college at all. But it is not just the costs and lack of money that makes college tough for these students.

According to Forbes, even when working class students get to college, they feel out of place and not confident. They feel that they do not have a sense of belongingness, and this plays a significant role to the reason on why they are more likely to drop out. The problem does not necessarily rely on whether they can afford to attend college or not, but the way they feel when they are already there.

A survey has found that many of the working class students feel that they do not belong to their college or university, and that is because of a number of factors, including the lack of diversity among their peers and professors or instructors; the traditions; the language used; and how they feel overwhelmed by their surroundings.

While being with students from similar backgrounds will make them feel better, colleges and universities must also take a look at the things they can change and improve. It is not enough that the number of working class students is increased, colleges must remember that it just does not stop there.

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