Saturday, Dec 16 2017 | Updated at 03:38 PM EST

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Mar 06, 2017 06:20 AM EST

Clarkson University, UGA Study Finds How Cocoa Lessens Caffeine's Anxiety Side Effect

Close
Video game news round-up: Doomfist release, Telltale Games and a legendary Pokemon Go announcement

A study by researchers from Clarkson University and the University of Georgia has found that combining cocoa and caffeine can help improve cognitive performance. Finally, a scientifically-proven reason to drink mocha lattes!

Clarkson University assistant professor of physical therapy and physician assistant Ali Boolani collaborated with University of Georgia researchers to investigate the effects of brewed cocoa consumption on cognitive performance. Specifically, it showed the impact on attention, motivation to perform as well as feelings of anxiety, energy and fatigue, Clarkson University's official website reported.

The double-blind study took about a year. Boolani asked test subjects to drink brewed cocoa, cocoa with caffeine, caffeine without cocoa and a placebo which did not have caffeine nor cocoa. After they drank the beverage, they were required to do tests that checked their cognitive tasks and mood.

Boolani said that they enjoyed conducting the study. The researchers found that cocoa increases cerebral blood flow. This results to an increase in cognition and attention.

Moreover, they discovered that caffeine alone can produce anxiety and that cocoa lessens the anxiety-producing effects of caffeine. Thus, drinking them together is the perfect blend for any student struggling to study for tomorrow's exam.

It was revealed that the study was sponsored by The Hershey Company. There are speculations that new or enhanced products may come after the study.

The study has been published in the journal "BMC Nutrition." Other researchers involved in the project were Jacob B. Lindheimer, from War Related Illness and Injury Study Center - VA New Jersey Health Care System, Bryan D. Loy, of Oregon Health & Science University, Stephen Crozier, from The Hershey Company, and Patrick J. O'Connor from the University of Georgia.

Boolani added that he will be conducting more tests and follow-up studies at Clarkson University to investigate the differences in natural and synthetic caffeine. He will also be doing more cocoa studies.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics