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Feb 17, 2017 07:44 AM EST

Celebrity Health Advice Is Bad For Your Health, Says Law Professor

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Celebrities are the most common medium for advertising and information. People look to their favorite actors, artists and celebrity idols for a change into their own personality and lifestyle. For instance, seeing a pop icon wear a certain brand of clothing and recommending the brand can influence a person's style. But what about celebrity health advice?

But according to an Alberta law professor, following a celebrity health advice is actually bad for a person's health. Tim Caulfield, a law professor, author and research director at the University of Alberta's Health Law Institute says that words of advice from celebrities could be ruining a person's health and the people around them.

During a seminar at FarmTech, Caulfield says that this particular century exposes people to so much good science and information. But at the same time, he stresses that there are so much ridiculous information out there such as celebrity health advices, as reported by Alberta Farmer Express.

For example, Donald Trump who is a business celebrity and the current president of the United States of America, has repeatedly claimed that there is a connection between vaccination and autism. Caulfield stresses that there is no study that supports his celebrity health advice. Because Caulfield considers this as misguided advice, it can be a health hazard.

But these celebrity health advices can be avoided if people demand the truth in advertising and look more to scientific literacy. Real science and sharing real information can help people be much more critical in their decision making.

While Caulfield insists on this point, celebrity physician Dr. Oz actually takes celebrity health advice. He claims that whenever he sees a celebrity doing something different, he gets curious. For example, Hugh Jackman would go on intermittent fasts of 12 hours or more to work on his role as Wolverine.

After a paper on the subject was published, Dr. Oz took Hugh Jackman's fitness regime as his personal celebrity advice to get fit and bulked up, as reported by Page Six. However, Oz warns people that this kind of regime is not fit for everyone.

Want to know more about his regime and diet? Dr. Oz explains the Total 10 Rapid Weight Loss Plan in the video below:

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