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Feb 10, 2017 11:51 PM EST

Tesla Factory: Poor Working Conditions, Plus Really Low Pay; Here's the Company's Response

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Tesla chief executive Elon Musk denied allegations that its California Branch is abusing its workers with low pay, poor working conditions, and are suffering from preventable injuries. Self proclaimed Tesla employee, Jose Moran, posted about the issues on abuse last Thursday.

Tesla Factory: Poor Working Conditions, Plus Really Low Pay; Here's the Company's Response

Moran claims that he works at the Fremont operations of Tesla. He wrote an article on Medium and detailed the alleged abuse in its California facility. In his post, Moran said that the workers in Tesla's factory paid its employees less than the national average salary of auto workers, Tech Crunch reported. The cost of living in the Bay area is more expensive than other areas where car factories are located.

Musk took to Twitter to deny alleged abuses saying that Moran's attack is morally outrageous since Tesla is the only car company left running in California due to the high cost of operations, CNBC reported. Musk even questioned Moran's authenticity as a worker in the company. Musk claims that Moran is paid by the United Autoworkers Union to work in the company and come up with a union.

Poor Working Conditions, Plus Really Low Pay

Regarding the low pay, Moran said that Tesla has already addressed this issue last November. He said the company provided a base pay raise, but not without making counter steps against the employee organization. Moran even said that Tesla is trying to suppress its workers from creating their own union.

In Moran's Medium post, he claims that a lot of workers in the company have already been planning to form a union with the help of UAW, but they are scared of doing so after Tesla threatened them not to speak out. Workers were required to sign confidentiality agreements to make sure they don't speak against the company, said Moran.

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