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Feb 02, 2017 07:24 AM EST

Leadership Career Advice: Make Friends At Work And See Your Career Fly

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Leadership Career Advice: Make Friends At Work To Change Your Career
Business Development and Marketing for Uber, Marshall Osbourne speaking on Day Two of Leaders Sport Business Summit 2016 at Stamford Bridge on October 6, 2016 in London, England.
(Photo : Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images for Leaders)

A lot of people make the mistake into thinking that their good work is enough merit to be noticed and get promoted at work. While there's some truth to it, one's solitary effort is not enough and is nothing compared to having a network - people who have the information and valuable advice. Here's how you can build your network at work and make allies.

Take time to know people at work

People love helping people, especially those they know. Most of the time, they will get out of their way to help and support the people they know. The same way goes when you take the time to know people at work.

One friend can go a long way and how much more a lot of them. Imagine one friend introducing you to another friend who can help you. Or another one connecting you with someone who can improve your skills.

Listen carefully

One of the best ways to build allies is to listen to people and observe what they do. When people see that you are interested in what they are doing, you are gaining a friend. That's because people want to feel that what they are doing is significant and you paying attention to them adds to that significance.

Aside from listening, asking relevant questions about your position is also a great way to learn and to earn friendships. Also, people would love to share their ideas because it also adds importance to what they're doing.

Get people into the game early

People usually feel resentful when you did not let them into the game early on. It sends the message that you didn't really need their help and when you ask for help half-way through, you might not get the help you need. Worse, they won't help you at all. On the other hand, when you let them in the project much earlier, they feel a sense of ownership.

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