Saturday, Dec 16 2017 | Updated at 11:22 PM EST

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Jan 27, 2017 08:29 PM EST

How Students Use Technology And Apps In College According To Survey

Close
Supersonic air travel could be making a comeback

Generation Z, the young ones born after the millenials, are enjoying the advancements in technology. Smartphones, ultra-portables, near-field communication (NFC) technologies, and other advancements, are all at the tip of a student's fingertips nowadays.

But how does our college-age youth use technology?

According to a survey of more than 500 college students, conducted by insights agency Fluent, Gen Z "increasingly works harder and shops smarter," taking advantage of the many conveniences brought about by technology.

Michael Carey, EVP at Fluent, said in a press release that there are a lot of opportunities to reach out to Gen Z if only those who want to reach out to them would be willing to appreciate the "tightrope they walk." Today's students are able to receive instant gratification through technology, and given that they comprise a fourth of the total U.S. population, it is very important to understand what works for them.

Here are some of the findings in the survey conducted by Fluent.

Work and Playz

More students are saying they do not play video games anymore

 rising from 38% last year to 44% this year. In addition, those who play game apps in phones and tablets dropped from 63%% to 53%. About 75% of survey respondents said they have work: those who work part-time increased from 55% to 59% this year, and more students now work more hours per week in whatever job they have.

Cash no carry

Up to one-in-five students admit to walking around without carrying any money with them. Those who used to carry $20 or less rose to 50% from 40% last year, and the number of credit card owners also rose. PayPal is also replaced by Venmo as electronic means of payment. Of course, this means there's an increase in the number of students that prefer online shopping. About 54% prefer in-store shopping compared to online shopping.

Small Screens Replace Big Screens

This year, students think spend too much time on their smartphones. In fact, 40% of students admit they spend 6-10 hours per day in front of their smartphones, up from 35% last year. The use of laptops for content viewing decreases as smartphone usage increases.

More details can be found here.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics