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Dec 11, 2016 10:53 PM EST

The Evidence of Optimism in Fighting Off Life Threatening Diseases Like Cancer and Stroke

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A person that has a positive outlook in life can do a lot better, that's for sure. And not only that, recent research suggest that the power of positive thinking is linked to better health and longer life.

A new study has revealed that people, women in particular, are more likely to be able to beat life-threatening diseases such as cancer, heart diseases, stroke and infection if they are able to maintain an optimistic attitude.

The researchers led by Dr. Eric Kim, Social and Behavioural Sciences expert, suggest that positive thinking should be encouraged among patients suffering from serious diseases together with proper diet and exercise. This way, it will be easier for them to recover and be able to extend their lives.

Dr. Kim also told MailOnline that the link between positive thinking and health is important because it can be controlled and changed, and can therefore be helpful to help people.

He said that this is something that many people really do not consider nowadays as we are too much focused on the treatment for the sickness and not being optimistic.

"But actually by enhancing patients' optimism, as well as their diet and exercise regime, we could see plenty of health benefits," he said.

While the studies show that these findings are effective to women, researchers said that it could also be applicable for men.

And in order to improve optimism in life, Dr. Kim shared some advice.

"Good optimistic habits include writing down everything kind you have done for other people, or writing down everything you're grateful for every day for a week," he told MailOnline.

He also added that a person should visualize a goal for himself, as someone that he or she wants to become whether when it comes to career or personal relationships.

Meanwhile, Dr. Kim and his colleagues are looking forward to do more research to support biological association of optimism to improving overall health.

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