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Dec 01, 2016 05:41 AM EST

Science Says Nagging Can Help You Raise Successful Daughters

Mother and Daughter
A study by the University of Essex suggests that girls whose parents have high parental expectations are more likely to become successful women.
(Photo : Credit: Dave Reginek / Stringer)

It looks like this is going to be a good news for a lot of mothers out there. Researchers in the United Kingdom say that girls who have mothers who nag them are more likely to go to college, get high paying jobs, be more successful and avoid teen pregnancy.

A study by the University of Essex suggests that girls whose parents, more specifically mothers, have high parental expectations are more likely to become successful women. This is because the high expectations of their mothers influence their daughter's major life choices.

This study led by Ericka-Rascon Ramirez followed the lives of over 15,000 girls whose age are between 13 and 14 over a 10 year period. According to the research, nagging has an effect on your kids even if they pretend as though they are not listening.

"In many cases, we succeed in doing what we believe is more convenient for us, even when this is against our parents' will," writes Rascon-Ramirez. "But no matter how hard we tried to avoid our parents' recommendations, it is likely that they ended up influencing our choices."

In short, even if your daughter rolls hers eyes and acts irritated, they're still thankful for your advice and are mostly going to heed it.

Rascon-Ramirez also found that "What our parents expected about our school choices was, very likely, a major determinant of our decisions about conceiving a child or not during our teenage years."

The study concluded that parents with higher expectations about their children reduce the chance of their child to have teenage pregnancy by 4 percent compared to the "relaxed" parents. This study may also hold true for boys, because part of your parents' constant nagging and reminders still boils down to them expressing their expectations which in the long run is still going to work for your own good.

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