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Nov 29, 2016 12:57 PM EST

SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Blast Investigation Report May Arrive Next Month

SpaceX may submit its investigation report on the Falcon 9 rocket blast
SpaceX may submit its investigation report on the Falcon 9 rocket blast
(Photo : NASA via Getty Images)

The report for the investigation on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket explosion may arrive next month. This comes after Elon Musk revealed that the blast appears to have been caused by the liquid oxygen tank.

It was previously reported that the investigation on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blast was recently focused on the cryogenic helium system inside the spacecraft's second stage liquid oxygen tank. It was noted that this was the fuel that would have been used to help the rocket's cargo, which is the Amos-6 communications satellite, to move from Low Earth Orbit into Geostationary Transfer Orbit.

Earlier this month, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has admitted that they have "gotten to the bottom of the problem." He described the problem as "really surprising" and "something "that's never been encountered before in the history of rocketry."

Musk confirmed that the oxygen was too cold, though, that it actually turned solid. It was noted that the liquid helium containers inside the oxygen tank may have been responsible for pushing the oxygen to combustion.

According to The Wall Street Journal, SpaceX is expected to provide federal authorities the preliminary investigative report on Falcon 9 rocket's explosion. The report is expected to be submitted early next month.

It was noted that the report is part of the company's efforts to resume launching before the end of the year. Musk has also stated that launches may continue in December.

The investigation also included scrutiny of the rocket's design and quality. Experts believe, though, that problematic operational factors were to blame.

Inverse added that, if it was proven that operational error was the primary culprit, it would be good news for SpaceX. This is because it would mean that the Falcon 9's hardware is still safe for use.

An operational error would only require changes in the fueling process. This could facilitate the company's desire to resume launches before the end of the year.

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