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Nov 25, 2016 08:23 AM EST

NASA is Preparing Tasty Turkey with The Longest Expiration Date for 2023's Thanksgiving Dinner on Mars

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Life on Mars: Six scientists begin year long Isolation experiment in Hawaii to simulate conditions of Red Planet

Space station commander Shane Kimbrough shared Thanksgiving meals he had in space yesterday. While not having a holiday like his family had on Earth, he was still able to enjoy a Thanksgiving feast with his crew while looking at the spectacular view of the galaxy.

Kimbrough shared his meal-plan on Thanksgiving - that included turkey in a pouch, mashed potatoes and cherry blueberry cobbler for dessert, Space reported.

Turkey in a pouch, however, does not sound appetizing to people on Earth but NASA has everything planned for its dining logistics. The agency admits the challenges in making foods to survive in space, taste as real as it is while preserving its quality at its best for their astronauts.

Scientists at NASA are developing technologies to, not only make the foods taste delicious in space, but also to extend its shelf life up to seven years. Currently, the food brought into space faces a problem with expiry date as most of the astronauts' favorite meals won't even last a year, Wired reported.  

NASA Thanksgiving dinner in 2023 is currently 'being prepared'

Just as food is important to people on Earth, it is also important to astronauts on Mars.

Seven-year shelf life is necessary because these foods will be carried alongside the passengers to Mars and by the end of their journey, they would be able to eat the last, oldest turkey they bring.

Partnering up with military scientists, there will be two technologies applied in the food processing. A microwave sterilization that enables speedy heating and cooling processes - which allows to preserve the quality of a food, Astronaut reported.

And high-pressure technology that reduces heat but add more pressure in the process. Judging from both methods, the processes use less heating to ensure no loss in nutrient.

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