Wednesday, Dec 13 2017 | Updated at 09:40 AM EST

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Nov 22, 2016 09:48 AM EST

Trump University Scandal Continues Even After Settlement

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Trump's ex-adviser Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI

After Donald Trump's win this month, he is going to become the President of the United States next year. But before he takes his seat in the Oval Office, he did have a few scores to settle.

One such score includes the fraud cases against him regarding Trump University. Donald Trump is known to never back down from an argument or even a legal law suit. However, according to reports, Trump decided to pen an abrupt settlement agreement right after his presidential win.

While Trump is busy meeting with leaders and other authorities to comprise his cabinet and administration, he did not neglect the fraud cases against him. According to the New Yorker, it looked like an attempt to prevent embarrassment on his part. During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump continued to express that the fraud cases that he faced are baseless and that he is going to win it. He also promised that he would never settle. But now, he is singing a different tune.

The fraud cases held against Trump's name were due to the complaints coming from thousands of people who accused Trump University of stealing their money after luring them to a real-estate course that did not meet expectations. They described the school as a "bait and switch" operation. The school forced customers into enrolling by using sales tactics.

Many felt cheated by this. According to reports, Trump's approval of advertisements saying that he is ready to share his real estate secrets did not materialize. Trump never attended any of the seminars or conferences that had his name on it.

Eric Schneiderman, one of Donald Trump's lawyers, announced that Trump has agreed to a settlement involving three civil cases regarding Trump University. One law suit is in New York, while two are in California. According to the settlement, Trump had agreed to settle $25 million for violating state education laws.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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