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Nov 19, 2016 08:10 AM EST

Guide To The Most Frequently Asked Questions During Tech Interviews

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One of the most important steps in the hiring process is the interview, and most of the time interviews are really stressful, which is why it always helps when you come in prepared.

Below are some of the questions that a number of tech interviewers love to ask during interviews, which they shared with Forbes. Find out what they ask and why.

1.  "When you don't know the answer to something, what is the first thing that you do?" - Annette Stone, Senior Manager of Recruiting, Wayfair Engineering

According to Stone, this question gives them an idea if the candidate has the natural ability to solve problem and can manage to do it on their own. This will also let them hear if the candidate has the initiative to do some research before escalating the issue to their manager.

2.  "If you could design your dream job, what would it look like?" -Talent Acquisition Manager at ONTRAPORT, Sara Hetyonk

This is an interesting question for Sarah because this allows a candidate to be as creative as they can be. It will also reveal what the candidate wants to achieve long term and this allows her to gauge whether the candidate is excited enough for his or her dream job.

3. "Tell me about your process of getting work done. When you get a new job or take on a new project, how do you go about doing it successfully?" - Matt Doucette, Director of Global Talent Acquisition at Monster.

This question allows Matt to understand the methodology a candidate uses when he works. He is looking at whether the candidate has the 6 P's namely a purpose, plan, process, persistence, persuasive communication and pride.

4. "Can you tell us about a time you failed?" - Megan Gray, team operations manager at Marxent

This is very helpful to decipher if a candidate has the ability to overcome failure without having to hide their mistakes. It really doesn't help a company if an employee hides behind errors and failures, and employees who know how to own up to their mistakes and learn from them are better appreciated.

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