Sunday, Dec 17 2017 | Updated at 04:05 PM EST

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Nov 15, 2016 07:00 AM EST

Nintendo Classic Mini Consoles Takes 3DS; Brought Back Power Line [VIDEO]

Close
Emma Stone named highest-paid actress in the world

Nintendo launched its NES Classic Edition and sold out almost immediately. They even brought back Power Line as a gimmick to help sell the product.

The NES Classic Edition used nostalgia to sell. It fielded titles such as "Super Mario Bros. 3," "Metroid" and "The Legend of Zelda" already built in. Moreover, Nintendo re-opened Power Line to further play on the gamers' sentimentality. Calling the number plays recordings of Nintendo counsellors recalling and sharing their experience with Power Line.

The original Power Line was a great manpower initiative during the late 80's and early 90's. It was conceived as a way to help gamers get through tricky parts of certain games before the Internet came to be. Aide came from a force of trained phone counsellors with thick manuals filled with hand-drawn maps and scribbled notes. Furthermore, calls came in so frequently that it became an integral part of the gaming experience of that time, Polygon reported.

The Mini NES console was a sold-out success with current resale values going for hundreds or even thousands of dollars online. However Nintendo is promising more stock before the holidays to fill the high demand, Forbes reported.

Forbes also predicted that Nintendo might follow on their achievement with NES Classic Edition with a Mini SNES next year and a Mini N64 for 2018, perhaps even a Mini Gamecube in the future. If the demand continues, Nintendo may have hits every holiday season if they follow this trend.

Speaking of the holidays, the Mini consoles could be an alternative gift idea to Nintendo's 3DS console. The Mini's are cheaper, going for around $60 retail. Plus, adult gamers will appreciate them as much as the kids will. Furthermore, its simplicity can be a bonus compared to the complexity and problems associated with the 3DS.

Certain versions of the 3DS are known to cause headaches if improperly handled while using the 3D function. A jerk of a hand or a slight shift of head position can take it out of the "sweet spot." This turns the 3D image from crisp to drunken-double-vision very quickly.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics