Sunday, Oct 23 2016 | Updated at 09:28 PM EDT

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Oct 19, 2016 09:39 AM EDT

A Florida Education Savings Account Saved This Child’s Life

Daughter hugging her mother before going to school
When Faith's family (not in picture) saw that they are spending around $30,000 per year just to cater to Faith's educational needs, they decided to pursue a much more innovative option.
(Photo : Jean Chung/Getty Images)

When starting a family, it is normal to think about the children's tuition and savings. Sometimes it also includes teaching the child how to save money for his or her own future.

But there is one particular types of savings has changed numerous lives. Parents handling their child's education through a form of personalized education savings accounts has transformed the lives of many under-served students.

One particular student is a child with Down syndrome, cites Daily Signal. Faith Kleffel, who has Down syndrome, uses an education savings account. With this, she is able to access the type of education options and courses that meets her specific learning needs.

The ESA or also known as the Gardiner Scholarship gives her learning options tailored for her. The Gardiner Scholarship Program started in 2014 in Florida. When Faith's family saw that they are spending around $30,000 per year just to cater to Faith's educational needs, they decided to pursue a much more innovative option. In celebration of Down Syndrome Awareness Month this October, Faith's story emphasizes how ESA can be beneficial for all families, most especially for families that have special needs kids.

The ESA affords kids like Faith the opportunity to pay for the education that is suitable for each child. Not all Down syndrome kids are the same. Because of this, Faith is now able to enjoy reading and studying math, and other social skills too.

The Gardiner Scholarship enables Faith to receive physical therapies necessary to treat Faith's ankle problems. Plus there is the occupational therapies that will help her learn to brush her hair and teeth, tie her shoes-all skills that will allow Faith to be more independent.

She did try her hand in a normal public school environment. But it was not the right platform for her. A public school environment is not conducive to her specific physical, academic and even social needs. And Faith confesses that she loves school. Her mother, Julie, says that raising a child is difficult when it comes to financial challenges. "Compound that with a special-needs child. It can take your breath away," she adds. For Faith's mom, the scholarship money makes a huge difference in her family and especially, for Faith.

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