Sunday, Oct 22 2017 | Updated at 06:11 AM EDT

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Oct 10, 2016 05:39 AM EDT

Learn Surgery Through A New Surgical Training App And Video Game

Close
Twitter Reacts To Marvel's New 'Inhumans' Trailer Debut At SDCC 2017

Your smartphone and laptop has apps that can help you solve problems and simulate real world scenarios. But there is one thing that stands out from everything else - someone devised a way to practice surgery.

In a way, it is like that Doctor Surgery game where you poke with a scalpel and the board buzzes if you did the wrong thing. Only, much more realistic. Because you can't make mistakes when it comes to surgery.

Although there are many ways to practice surgery in the medical field. Some opt for a computer simulation. Others use a cadaver. Medical students get to conduct surgery with the guided hands of an expert. But still, these are not enough. According to Mobile Health News, medical students and physicians who need to continue their surgical training and education are vital. Which is why the Chicago-based technology company, Level EX, has thought of an idea that uses today's technology. Level EX is addressing this need by bringing the visual effects from video games and combining I with mobile apps. Visual effects from the entertainment and recreation (gaming) industries are filled with tons of resources that can feature a medicine style of viewing.

Are you thinking Grand Theft Auto while wearing a surgical mask? Not exactly. Airway EX, which is Level EX's first app, is a surgical training simulator. It is built by video game developers with the assistance of physicians from real life surgeries. Footage of different kinds of surgeries are entered in the sims. It is now in beta testing mode. And medical students can grab and download it for free on both iOS and Android.

Airway EX helps physicians and future medical professionals learn how to virtually conduct surgeries on realistic patients. It is so realistic that it bleeds like a real human being and you can even see their pores.

Those in the medical field, especially anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, critical care specialists, emergency room physicians and pulmonologists, can use this app. They can even earn a Continuing Medical Education credit by playing the app.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics