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Oct 10, 2016 08:03 PM EDT

Drones For STEM Education? Brooklyn Students Learn Science And Technology

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You may have seen them flying and buzzing around, taking pictures or delivering packages. Companies are using them to go from point A to point B, and even document aerial footage. But there is now a new use for them.

At some point, drones are a nuisance to society. Users who own them often misuse the device and enter private properties in order to spy. One such example is a drone is being used to capture hidden set shots of 'Star Wars'. Some members of the community shoot them down. While private companies like Amazon are looking at using drones for local and domestic deliveries. Laws are being looked at in order to regulate the use of these drones in different states.

Now, drones have a better and much more valuable use to society.

Drones are now being used to teach children. It is an expensive piece of technology, one that usually requires the user to build them or have them built by tech companies. Now, a school in Brooklyn is using this kind of technology to interest kids in science and technology.

A drone education for Brooklyn students is a new way to engage students, according to Fox5NY. A school is investing in this kind of technology to teach kids about them. Think of it as getting with the times. After all, drones are part of this new generation's technology. And it is only fitting that hundreds of Central-Brooklyn Elementary students are being exposed to this. These kids are taking flight to a different level. As part of their 4-H Nationnal Youth Science Day, the Cornell University Cooperative Extension challenges kids to take on science.

Lucinda Randolph-Benjamin, the program leader of the Cooperative Extension program, says that the youth are learning how to code a drone and control a drone. They also learn how to do remote sensing and fly them with little cameras under the belly of the drone. They hope that the students will use this inspiration in order to solve real world problems. This October, more than 100,000 students will take part in the drone challenge.

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