Sunday, Oct 22 2017 | Updated at 05:03 PM EDT

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Sep 13, 2016 02:36 AM EDT

The Sour Reality About 'Free Education' Academic Campaign By US Politicians! [VIDEO]

Close
World's biggest radio telescope detects two pulsars during trial run

U.S. politicians can all be heard yelling sweet tones over promise of "free education". As much as people are accustomed to this form of campaign, it is still however essential to look into how sour the reality is in making education free.

Is there such thing as free education? Lest, should education be attained for free? Wherefore, why are America's political platforms filled with politicians that make so much fuss about free education? Perhaps the first thing any politicians would expound upon to take control of the winning side is the concept of "free education" through free tuitions.

As presidential candidate Hillary Clinton would politicize it, her administration is rather confident on proposing and later realizing free tuition for students with families making less than $120, 000 annually. However, shifting their sight to the other side of such an ambitious proposal, to the more likely practical angle, academic analysts immediately taste the sour consequences.

The truth is that governments in the world cannot actually do free education. Economists would rather call it suicidal. As it is embarrassing among American politicians to verge on the concept, it could immensely be expensive for students and taxpayers, the Courier reported.

The least that could happen in a federal government is losing control over the value of the economic degrees which will soon be dragged down by the dramatic rise of tuitions, say from $ 5,000- 10,000.00. Despite the Robin Hood-sounding plans purported by Clinton- that the brackets only allow the rich to give what is due to the poor, they are however forcing the rich to give out a whole portion from the economic slab, thus risking stability. A failure in domino proportion, that's how analysts best describe the proposal, the Guardian.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics