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Sep 08, 2016 11:03 AM EDT

Segregated Black Housing At California State University Prompts Debate

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Is this New York's dirtiest apartment?

Earl Ofari Hutchinson, the President of the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable, explains that many have fought and even died to break down barriers when it comes to racial, social and cultural segregation. However, California State University, Los Angeles looks like it does not acknowledge that. California State introduced a housing program that left many in a foul mood and spurred foul mouths.

The housing program at California State allowed the segregation of African-American students, cites ABC 7. There are over a thousand students on the California state campus. And the housing can hold about 24 of them. But the Halisi Scholars Black Living-Learning Community noted that something is off. And this sparked a national debate which prompts civil rights activists to speak out. Hutchinson stresses that Los Angeles officials should review and reconsider the policy regarding the public university's act immediately.

In defense of the housing segregation, a press release from CSULA Black Student Union stresses that back in February, the housing program was agreed upon between the group and Covino - the CSULA President. It alleges that on Dec. 7, 2015, they reached an agreement after several demands.

"The Director of Housing has been asked to work with administration and the BSU in creating, and developing, a Black Scholars' living learning community. We expect the development of the Black Scholars Hall to take place prior to the Fall 2016 term," states the report.

A freshman living in the dorm expresses that it is not about segregation. Jonathan Thomas, who is studying communications and a freshman at CSULA says that it was meant for students like him to feel safe. "I don't know where that assumption even came from," says Thomas.

CSULA insists that their dorm policies are following a "themed living community" and schools like Berkeley, Stanford and more are using the same housing themes.

This has already reached local and state news. What are your thoughts on this?

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