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Sep 04, 2016 10:30 AM EDT

Career Planning In College: 5 Traits Every Young Job Candidate Needs

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Students should already be preparing for the career they want as early as their college days. Aside from equipping themselves with all the technical knowledge needed for their future job, students should also develop their personalities and learn soft skills that can help them in the long run.

Liz Wessel, a former Google employee and the co-founder and CEO of WayUp, a website where college students can find jobs at companies such as Microsoft, Uber, The New York Times, Disney and Google, revealed that there are a few traits that most hiring managers want to see in young professionals. "Our team at WayUp analyzed entry-level job postings for recent grads across all industries, and there were five traits that consistently appeared in the list of 'required skills' that employers will write," she told Business Insider.

Wessel shared five traits that hiring managers look for in young job candidates. Having these characteristics will definitely help you land the job that you want and keep it.

1. Being able to communicate clearly.

It may be the most sought-after skill in all types of industries but it's not so common. College students should hone this skill in order to set themselves apart from the pack.

2. Being able to sell an idea.

The ability to persuade others and help them understand and see your vision is another vital skill that young professionals should have. Students can enhance this skill by taking a class about marketing or advertising.

3. Being able to write well.

In today's day and age, strong writing skills will truly help boost your career. Communication, whether in writing or through speaking, is necessary for you to be able to thrive in the workforce.

4. Being able to identify trends and take advantage of them.

Critical decision-making as well as the ability to assess risks and opportunities are skills that, according to Wessel, "will quickly identify you as a valuable go-getter." Starting your own business while you're still in college will help you learn basic business skills.

5. Being able to work with others.

Hiring managers nowadays are placing more importance on employee culture. Young professionals should develop their emotional intelligence and interpersonal skills.

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