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Jul 22, 2016 07:25 AM EDT

Sunscreen Ratings: Beware of SPF False Claims

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The issue on sunscreen ratings heats up again as Senator Charles Schumer urged FDA to launch an investigation of SPF products after finding out that some brands failed to meet requirements.

Consumer Reports did a lab test on sunscreen ratings

Consumer Reports did a lab test to prove SPF claims and observed it for four years. It found that from 60 sunscreen products, more than 40 percent failed to meet the label claim. Testing sunscreen products labeled with SPF 40 to 110 - the result showed only 70 percent of them are higher than SPF 30. In one of the tests, sunscreen lotion labeled SPF 50 only had the protection strength of SPF 8, AM New York reported.

According to Schumer, many consumers are getting burned due to using sunscreen with lower SPF than what it says on the label. He said that FDA should immediately investigate these SPF claims and find which products labels that don't match the SPF protection being offered.

What experts have to say about sunscreen ratings

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in US with 5 million of people are diagnosed each year, American Cancer Society wrote. And the American Academy of Dermatology advices consumers to wear sunscreen SPF 30 every day as a primary protection against skin cancer.

Aside from sunscreen ratings issue, FDA warns consumers to avoid sun exposure between 10 am and 2 pm. Experts suggest covering up with clothing and sunglasses as part of the defense against the sun.

Consumer Reports also warned consumers who tend to use too little or forget to reapply after sweating. It is important to reapply sunscreen lotion every two hours or more frequent when you are heavily perspired. Experts also suggest consumers to look for broad spectrum sunscreens and not to go above 50 since it is considered negligible, UH news reported.

Do you think sunscreen ratings may not mean that much?

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