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Jun 10, 2016 06:29 AM EDT

Growing Proportion Of English Students Think Degree Is A Waste Of Money, New Survey Reveals

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A growing concern among English students is that their degrees are a waste of money as revealed in a recent survey.

A considerable amount of English undergraduates had a change of heart regarding pursuing their degrees as the students deem the degrees now a poor value for money, the Times Higher Education reported.

The Higher Education Policy Institute had conducted the annual student academic experience survey, which revealed that 35 percent of its respondents believe that their degrees are all but irrelevant now.

This year's results had increased by one percent, and it has been believed that this was caused by the raising of the tuition fee cap by £9,000, which was back in 2012. Only 33% have the mutual sentiment that their degrees are still worth the money.

The increased tuition fee cap was imposed with the government's argument that the increase would benefit student experience in universities.

The survey had garnered a 15,221-strong turnout, which is published on the Higher Education Policy Institute website. It has also revealed that only 8% of respondents agree with the increase of tuition fee cap of universities.

In addition, 22 percent of respondents believe that the government should be responsible for paying the full cost of their higher education.

The vice president for higher education of the National Union of Students, Sorana Vieru, has voiced concerns over the increasing debt that plagues the student population. Vieru points out that the government has the power to stop the growing issue.

Despite 85 percent of the students had responded that they were satisfied with their university experience, the number went down from 87 percent from the previous year's results.

The students have also shed light on the quality of teaching among universities. A little over the sample size stated that staff were supportive, while just under a half were able to say that their teachers motivated the students to do their best or had a hand in exploring their interests.

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