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May 21, 2016 05:56 AM EDT

‘Department of Labor’ Amends ‘Fair Labor Standards Act’; ‘FLSA’ Mandates Salary Increase For Athletic Department Less Prominent Workers [VIDEO]

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A noticeable rise in compensation for best-known employees in college sports programs, but the "US Department of Labor" on Tuesday has revealed changes in "Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)." Now college athletic department and sports program faces the prospect making substantial pay hike for most of their less prominent workers.

Being unmoved since 2004, the FLSA facelift on rules and salary regulations could necessitate athletics departments to start giving massive amount of dollar paychecks and benefits to staffers from assistant coaches and to trainers including ticket-office personnel. And if not, according to USA Topday, workers who would receive insufficient salary increases will have to become hourly wage-earners whose works may accumulate 40-hour a weeks or rather be paid for overtime rates whilst they go beyond 40 hours.

At the moment, workers who go beyond 40 hours weekly are not required to be paid at overtime rates if these three criteria are met:

1)     They are employed salary based.

2)     Their jobs are primarily administrative, executive or professional,.

3)     Lastly, they earn a minimum of $23,660 annually.

The new FLSA rules state that to be exempt from overtime pay, workers should to make at least $47,476 annually. The new directive is slated to take effect on Dec. 1, USA Today reported.

Labor Department has addressed the new FLSA rules with a document in collision on the higher-education sector containing a section that might provide help to some athletics programs. Sounding tricky, the document suggests coaches could get exemption regardless of their salary if their primary duty is teaching including instructing athletes' performance in sport, the report said. However, if their primary duty is doing manual labor or recruiting athletes, therefore, they cannot be considered teachers.

Meanwhile, an issue for NCAA Division I athletic departments arises as this new expense coincides with series of alterations in NCAA rules intended to augment the benefits athletes will be allowed to receive. Meanwhile, check the video below on how to prepare for the upcoming changes:

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