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May 09, 2016 05:55 AM EDT

No Correlation between Brain Cancer and Mobile Phones, Study Finds

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Researchers want to know if there is a link between mobile phones and brain cancer. To find out, they go back to a few decades ago.

For many years, researchers and the public have been made to believe that cell phone radiations could possibly cause brain tumors. However, researchers who currently examined the association; do not find any link.

The study compares two database, both are age specific. The data recorded from 1982 to 2012 shows that there were more than 19,000 men and 14,000 women with brain cancer in Australia.

In a range of 30 years, the increase rate of brain cancer is found to lag despite the global rise (81 percent) of smartphones used around the globe. As for the brain cancer patients, three-decade data shows the number of males diagnosed with brain cancer increases slightly, but the females remain stable. However, according to the paper, the brain cancer incidents are found in group aged 70 to 84.

Research lead, Professor Simon Chapman then added that if the relation were to be true, then 30 years of incidents would mean a peak rise in the disease, Daily Mail has learned. The paper analyzes heavy users, assuming that the expected numbers should be 2,038; but it turns out only 1,435. The report concludes 'a flatline in brain cancer numbers'.

Many countries have studied the correlation between brain cancer and mobile phone radiation, including the US, England, New Zealand and Nordic regions. The finding is consistent, stating that the increase of patients with brain cancer is not correlated to the use of mobile phones. Moreover, this study is not a single subject or a group of people, but an extremely large numbers.

Another finding about hands free also shows that there is no data related to brain cancer. It is a matter of spending more on phone accessories that could put the mind at peace, as Sydney Morning Herald reported.

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