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May 09, 2016 05:17 AM EDT

Calvin College Mumps: Possible Outbreak in Campus? Anti-Vaccination Students To Be Barred From Campus

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A possible case of mumps has been reported by Calvin College in Michigan. The institution posted on their website that they are on alert for the disease. Students who are opposed to getting vaccinated may be barred from getting inside the campus to avoid a possible mumps outbreak.

Calvin College posted on their health services website that a student may be infected with mumps. The college will know by Monday noon if the mumps infection is confirmed. They are cooperating with the Kent County Health Department to enact protocols to prevent the infection and spread of contagious diseases like mumps.

If the possible mumps case is confirmed, students who have not been vaccinated will not be able to enter the Calvin College campus for 26 days. Those without record for being vaccinated against mumps have been offered vaccination. However, those unwilling to get their shots will not be allowed to enter the Calvin College campus. They will instead continue completing the semester off-campus, WZZM13.com reported.

Calvin College has a population of almost 4,000 students. It is not clear if the mumps disease has spread or how many are affected, Michigan Live noted. Authorities are concerned of a possible scenario of outbreak. A mumps outbreak could disrupt classes, activities and events in the school.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes mumps as an infection that could result in inflamed salivary glands which will result in inflamed jaw and cheeks. Symptoms of mumps include headache, fever, tiredness, aching muscles and appetitle loss.


Mumps is a viral infection that is easily spread through a person's saliva or mucus. A person can get mumps infection from an infected person via talking, sneezing, coughing, sharing things used for eating and drinking and touching infected surfaces.

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