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Apr 14, 2014 08:26 AM EDT

Low Testosterone Levels Key to a Romantic and Satisfying Relationship, Study

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University of Michigan researchers add a twist to the long standing myth that high testosterone levels are required for a romantic and a satisfying relationship. In a latest study, researchers found couples reported greater satisfaction and commitment levels in their relationship when they had lower levels of testosterone.

Robin Edelstein, associate professor of psychology and the study's lead author, said that higher testosterone levels is normally linked to attracting sexual partners, lower levels of testosterone  may be better long-term relationships.

"The assumption is generally that high testosterone is good for sexual relationships," Edelstein said in a statement. "These findings suggest that once people are in a relationship, lower levels of testosterone may be beneficial-or may reflect better ongoing relationship dynamics."

This is the first study to establish a link between testosterone levels and women.

For the study, the researchers surveyed 39 heterosexual couples aged between 18 and 31, who were in relationships for as long as two months to seven years. They answered questionnaire about their satisfaction levels, commitment and investment. Participants also provided their saliva for analysis.

The findings are published in the journal Hormones and Behavior.

Recently, a University of Porto in Portugal study found that regular churchgoers are more likely to be satisfied about their love life than their non-regular counterparts.

Researchers said that being religious was found to have a greater effect on romantic pleasure than other factors like education. They found that a combination of factors such as age, religious involvement, marital status and love style (e.g. manipulative or playful), positively affects a person's love and happiness.

The finding supports previous studies that showed religious people tend to have improved mental health, enhanced fulfillment and healthy sexual and romantic relationships.

"We show that [life satisfaction] is almost entirely about the social aspect of religion, rather than the theological or spiritual aspect of religion," Chaeyoon Lim, a sociologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison told LiveScience. "We found that people are more satisfied with their lives when they go to church, because they build a social network within their congregation."

PsychCentral has listed secrets of happy couples:

-          Spend quality time together

-          Give sufficient freedom to partners

-          Communicate whenever necessary

-          Be honest with your partner

-          Sometimes agree to disagree

-          Do not constantly highlight your partner's negative points

-          Focus on the positive points

-          Address problems and misunderstandings immediately

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