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Apr 13, 2017 12:46 PM EDT

Saving the Great Reef Barrier May Be Too Late; Some Parts Have Zero Chance of Recovery [Video]

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How breeding rare giant sea snails could save the Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef has been bleaching for two consecutive years due to the warming ocean. Now, footage from a helicopter reveals that it is the middle part that is suffering from bleaching. But scientists are trying to save this natural wonder with a better monitoring strategy that involves the ordinary people.

Coral bleaching is when the warm waters of summer disrupt the balance between corals and symbiotic algae. Due to this condition, the coral expels the algae, turning it into white. It is very serious, and a lot of journalists are jumping in to the issue saying that the Great Barrier Reef is at its terminal stage, The Guardian reported.

Coral bleaching may be very serious, but scientists say a bleached coral doesn't mean dead corals. This means there is no reason for panic and despair since bleached coral can heal, which means there is hope.

A lot of people are overwhelmed with the trending news that the Great Barrier Reef is at its terminal stage. But people who are concerned have a way to help scientists monitor the majestic marine natural structure. Fifteen years ago The University of Queensland started the CoralWatch citizen monitoring program, The Conversation reported.

It was created to help scientists monitor the environment a wider range and inform the people about marine science. People around the reef, snorkelers, and divers can inform scientists if they spot any coral bleaching around the Great Barrier Reef. This gives the experts a more detailed picture of the reef's health.

People who are concerned about the reef can participate through the CoralWatch app or site where they can color charts to measure the type of coral bleaching. The chart features 75 percent of corals, which means people can use it even without training. People will also be asked to enter what kind of coral is suffering from bleaching, where it is located, and the weather at the moment.

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