Monday, Oct 23 2017 | Updated at 01:13 PM EDT

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Nov 19, 2016 09:51 AM EST

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Urged To Stop Using Poor Environment Assessments By Sientists

Close
Arctic ice on record low

Canada's young scientists are concerned that the federal government is reviewing energy projects using poor data. They say that the existing process lacks the high scientific standards needed to get good results. This is addressed in an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudea urging him to make a strategic effort in rebuilding public trust for the environmental process.

Due to its significance on the health and environment effects to all Canadians, 1,300 and above researchers signed the petition. It urges Trudeau and the relevant cabinet ministers to improve the environmental assessment model and regulatory systems accordingly. Lapses are detected with the systems as far as scientists and researchers are concerned, says The Star.  

The letter also suggests for the government to be transparent. How science, its facts, and evidence followed for the review process are decided upon is crucial to come up with realistic results. Aerin Jacob, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Victoria, emphasizes the importance of the processes involved in the decision-making.

The Prime Minister's Office knew about the letter but declined to comments when pursued by the media. The Liberal government reviewed the country's environmental laws to change the previous Conservative government's policies. Over 200 scholars rallied back in May to stop the construction of the Site C hydroelectric dam located in northern British Columbia. Up to this moment, the government remains quiet with regards to the issues raised.

Royal Society of Canada president Maryse Lassonde expresses her group's serious concern to Prime Minister Trudeau after disclosing gaps and inadequacies in the environmental in the regulatory evaluation review process of the Site C Project. 

The $9-billion dam project for farmland water source in the First Nations territory creating an 83-kilometre reservoir often neglects the aboriginal population.  Undermining this error, the federal government approved in the summer, as per Huffington Post

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Get Our FREE Newsletters

Stay Connected With Us F T R

Real Time Analytics