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Jun 09, 2016 08:38 AM EDT

College Rejection Among Students; Three Ways To Overcome It

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College admission has always been nerve-racking to parents and students. An aspiring applicant should not be too concerned to a point that one would give up hope if one gets rejected from the intended college.

There are a handful of factors for which one might or might not get into their dream institution. One should bear in mind that receiving a college rejection letter is understandably disappointing, but the aspiring student should keep an eye on the main goal; get a higher education. That is primarily the point of aiming for college admission.

The bright side of it is that one college rejection letter is just one down to the nation's 2,675 schools. It's highly unlikely that one could be rejected in a handful of schools.

It's All Right To Be Disappointed

Consider all or most outcomes. When submitting an application letter is in itself a game of chance. A student has all the power to present a respectable GPA, some promising recommendation letters, and a few others and hope for the best. Keep in mind that there will always a handful of factors that may not go as expected.

Instead of looking at a college rejection letter with disgust, one should learn from it. A junior from the University of Pennsylvania, Rhiannon Grodnik, shared her experience with rejection letters, according to the US News & World Report.

"These decisions were all out of my control and that it did not really mean I was not good enough," Grodnik wrote. The goal is to control the feeling of disappointment and use it to set your sights onto the next option.

Keep A Long List Of Feasible Colleges

It's quite logical to keep tabs on multiple colleges as your target. This allows for a higher hit rate, and it would certainly assure an admission nevertheless.

Assistant vice president of admissions of New York University, Shawn Abbot, stated that admission officers are not in the "business of killing dreams." Applicants should not go for a single "dream college," as it is mathematically improbable to get a sure admission, according to Teen Vogue.

Keeping a handful into your watchlist would yield a higher hit-rate. This would help you cope faster than eyeing only one college; it's easier to move on to the next goal.

Always Stick To Your Ambitions

This society has witnessed time and time again that the road to success is not on a single path. Many may lose their way, but keeping a level head, and a goal to shoot for would keep one's journey to success a path worth taking.

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