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May 31, 2016 10:00 PM EDT

Diabetes Prevention: New Study Shows Low-Carb Diet Helps Control Diabetes, Reduces Symptoms

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There are good findings in the studies held to know the effect of low carbohydrate diets on diabetes. Over 80,000 people were asked to give up low-fat and high carbohydrate diet, they found out in the results that after ten weeks their blood-glucose levels dropped. Meanwhile, a new report has found three quarters of older children experiencing diabetes do not receive checks to keep their condition under control.

A National Paediatric Diabetes Audit of teenagers in England and Wales learned that just 25.4% of 12-year-olds were having all recommended checks performed, Telegraph reported.

These include: 1) eye screening 2) foot examination 3) measuring growth 4) blood pressure 5) kidney function 6) cholesterol. Diabetes UK affirmed that if children were not able to manage their diabetes earlier, they were more likely to be at risk of life-threatening problems, Telegraph added.

Meanwhile, several doctors have called for an overhaul of dietary guidelines following the new evidence regarding low-carbohydrate diets. Through rejecting guidelines and low intake of starchy food diet and high protein and "good" saturated fats, e.g. olive oil and nuts, about 80 percent of the patients had lost weight, with 10 percent coming off 9kg or more, University Herald reported.

The 70 percent of participants experienced improvements in blood glucose while the one fifth said they no longer needed drugs to control blood glucose by the end of the ten-week diagram. More than 2.7 million people in Britain have type 2 diabetes, this is a condition directly linked with obesity and a further 750,000 are expected to have undiagnosed symptoms.

The latest review results will come out a week after the National Obesity Forum and the Public Health Collaboration issued a report which also links carbohydrates to obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most notably, the document argues that "eating fat does not make you fat." A  PHE spokeswoman said the advice, agreed with Diabetes UK, is that people with diabetes should eat a diet constant with the Eatwell Guide, Telegraph said.

© 2017 University Herald, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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