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Mar 22, 2017 02:32 PM EDT

The tech industry is about to get some disruption this week. ARM Holdings has just entered the technological arms race, unveiling a new generation of chip design that has a strong focus on AI and machine learning. The new microarchitecture named ARM DynamIQ could be the new foundation for the next era of computing, ARM claims.

ARM's latest moves could alter the balance of power in the tech playing field, disrupting everything from AI to autonomous vehicles. And it's not just about disruption, it also puts tech stalwarts like Intel, AMD and even Nvidia into full high alert, telling them that something scary is coming. ARM's latest salvo could trigger a new technological arms race, one that can be nasty.

For a starter, ARM Holding is a UK-based semiconductor and software design company. Based in Cambridge, United Kingdom, ARM has been considered to be market dominant for processors in mobile phones and tablet computers. The company is also well-known in the Graphical Processing Units (GPU) space. Its lines of GPU are used in laptops, Android-powered tablets, and also some versions of Samsung's smartphones and smartwatches.

According to The Verge, which got the full details of the ARM story, the Cambridge-based tech company has just unveiled to the world its next generation of processor designs, the new ARM DynamIQ platform, which said to integrate the functionality required for an artificial intelligence or machine learning tech into ARM's chip design.

ARM said that chips being built on DynamIQ platform will be much easier to configure than traditional chip design. This would result to a more powerful breed of system-on-chip (SoC) and processors that can better handle the computing requirement of the future, which include AI, self-driving tech, machine learning and more advanced use.

The new architecture will also let chip makers optimize their silicon for specialized tasks like machine learning and AI. This will provide chip makers with the option to build AI accelerators directly into the chips, thus allowing systems to manage data and memory more efficiently.

In a recent interview with The Verge, John Ronco, ARM marketing product head, Ronco said that ARM has already licensed the new architecture to a number of the manufacturer, so the crowd could expect to see the first ARM DynamIQ-powered devices to hit the market by next year.

Some of the big highlights include a built-in power saving features, autonomous CPU memory power management, faster and more complex data processing for advanced computing, a new single cluster design with up to eight heterogeneous CPUs, and a redesigned memory subsystem.

Finally, ARM's new chip design could also help the companies challenge tech behemoth Intel in the hotly contested data center market. Fully equipped with AI and machine learning chops, ARM DynamIQ will also be able to improve performance and efficiency, thus leading to much cheaper consumer electronics products and longer battery lives.

For more information about the ARM chip technology, check out the ARM Community website.

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